What is the composition of the Earlwood 3b disposition

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What is the composition of the Earlwood 3b disposition

JohnDubery
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One for John Reimer really, but posted to the forum as I suspect there will be general interest.

I am interested to know the composition of the mixtures of the Earlwood 3b disposition - please would you enlighten me. If details are included with the disposition then please forgive me for missing them.

John Dubery
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Re: What is the composition of the Earlwood 3b disposition

John Reimer
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John,

I don't believe I have documented the composition of those mixtures, so all I can do is describe how they were made.

In the case of the Mixture IV on the Great, I followed the advice of a knowledgeable organist friend who suggested that each rank should go up in pitch to the top pitch one would find in a 2' rank, and then break back. I believe he had in mind some Italian organs. Unfortunately what he neglected to mention was that such organs are only four octave in compass. So really the ranks do not break back early enough. In retrospect he suggested that what I have produced is more of a Cymbal mixture! If you examine the soundfont you will see that the Mixture IV preset has two Instruments - one for the "unison" notes and one for the "quint" notes, which are tuned perfect and not tempered. So there is scope for adjusting the balance of unison and quint sounds in each split (or "zone"). The samples are synthesized.

In the case of the Mixtur II on the Positive, this is intended to be a close reproduction of the stop of that name on the small Walker (of Ludwigsberg) organ here in Sydney (actually in one of the university colleges). You would need to use the Audacity Analyser to determine where the break-back points are, if your ears cannot tell you. I don't remember if I used my Short Hybrid Sample technique for that stop (which would mean that fairly authentic attacks were produced), but the description on the relevant page of my website may refer to that. The samples, although synthesized, would bear a close connection to the actual spectra in the recordings of the stop (two ranks sounding together).

JohnR
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Re: What is the composition of the Earlwood 3b disposition

John Reimer
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John,
I've just had a look at the Earlwood Organ Model No.2 page on my website, referring to the Walcker (correct spelling this time!) and it says that Short Hybrid Samples were used. The page has no specific mention of the Mixtur II stop.

The link is http://home.exetel.com.au/reimerorgans/jOrgan_Index_Page.htm

JohnR
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Re: What is the composition of the Earlwood 3b disposition

JohnDubery
John,

Thanks, it is most interesting that the Great has a quint mixture (which I'd suspected).

This means it is useful to have a separate tierce/17th stop alongside the mixture to give a sound more similar to the typical English mixtures (e.g. Father Willis are commonly 17.19.22), the 17th being left unpulled when the cleaner quint mixture sound is desired.

JohnD