Raspberry pi zero

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Raspberry pi zero

Julie Porter
I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

RoyR
Hi, Julie,

                Very interesting post, thank you, I've often been tempted to dabble with Raspberry but it's pretty low on my priority list at present. I believe it has a USB spout, so you could use something like the external Soundblaser Live! 24 I use if I'm not happy with a computer's internal soundcard.

    Mind you, that's obsolete hardware now and, so far as I've seen, the modern replacements have a price tag that would look absurd in a Raspberry-based system!

    I don't need a soundcard for jOrgan as I use hardware synthesizers but I have used the Soundblaster on an auxiliary computer as a reverb. unit following the Edirol SD-20s that produce the analogue sound. 



      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 05:38, Julie Porter <[hidden email]> wrote:
I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

eagles051387
I have a pi3 which I shoulr probably test with for you guys and see how things go.

What woudl be the flavor of linux of choice?

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 10:26 AM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Julie,

                Very interesting post, thank you, I've often been tempted to dabble with Raspberry but it's pretty low on my priority list at present. I believe it has a USB spout, so you could use something like the external Soundblaser Live! 24 I use if I'm not happy with a computer's internal soundcard.

    Mind you, that's obsolete hardware now and, so far as I've seen, the modern replacements have a price tag that would look absurd in a Raspberry-based system!

    I don't need a soundcard for jOrgan as I use hardware synthesizers but I have used the Soundblaster on an auxiliary computer as a reverb. unit following the Edirol SD-20s that produce the analogue sound. 



      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 05:38, Julie Porter <[hidden email]> wrote:
I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

eagles051387
In reply to this post by Julie Porter
I think reading the original post

What do you guys think if i make a modified version of linux where jorgan woudl load directly with the UI etc instead of a desktop environment. Something lightweight without the necessary fluff of a normal distro?

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 6:38 AM, Julie Porter <[hidden email]> wrote:
I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

RoyR
In reply to this post by eagles051387
    Mine's a Minty bit but I thought the Pi came with its own flavour of Linux???

    

      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 16:09, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
I have a pi3 which I shoulr probably test with for you guys and see how things go.

What woudl be the flavor of linux of choice?

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 10:26 AM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Julie,

                Very interesting post, thank you, I've often been tempted to dabble with Raspberry but it's pretty low on my priority list at present. I believe it has a USB spout, so you could use something like the external Soundblaser Live! 24 I use if I'm not happy with a computer's internal soundcard.

    Mind you, that's obsolete hardware now and, so far as I've seen, the modern replacements have a price tag that would look absurd in a Raspberry-based system!

    I don't need a soundcard for jOrgan as I use hardware synthesizers but I have used the Soundblaster on an auxiliary computer as a reverb. unit following the Edirol SD-20s that produce the analogue sound. 



      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 05:38, Julie Porter <[hidden email]> wrote:
I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

RoyR
In reply to this post by eagles051387
   Sounds good for my kind of system but would the Pi have the muscle for a Fluidsynth-based one?



      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 16:12, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
I think reading the original post

What do you guys think if i make a modified version of linux where jorgan woudl load directly with the UI etc instead of a desktop environment. Something lightweight without the necessary fluff of a normal distro?

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 6:38 AM, Julie Porter <[hidden email]> wrote:
I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

eagles051387
In reply to this post by RoyR
There is raspian. I'm thinking of doing a system based off of Gentoo Linux

Sent from my iPhone

On 11 Aug 2016, at 17:30, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:

    Mine's a Minty bit but I thought the Pi came with its own flavour of Linux???

    

      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 16:09, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
I have a pi3 which I shoulr probably test with for you guys and see how things go.

What woudl be the flavor of linux of choice?

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 10:26 AM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Julie,

                Very interesting post, thank you, I've often been tempted to dabble with Raspberry but it's pretty low on my priority list at present. I believe it has a USB spout, so you could use something like the external Soundblaser Live! 24 I use if I'm not happy with a computer's internal soundcard.

    Mind you, that's obsolete hardware now and, so far as I've seen, the modern replacements have a price tag that would look absurd in a Raspberry-based system!

    I don't need a soundcard for jOrgan as I use hardware synthesizers but I have used the Soundblaster on an auxiliary computer as a reverb. unit following the Edirol SD-20s that produce the analogue sound. 



      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 05:38, Julie Porter <[hidden email]> wrote:
I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

RoyR
Hi, Jonathon,

                    Is that for any technical reason or just the one you happen to be most familiar with? That's really my situation with Mint, there are probably many other, equally good, ones but I just stick with what I've proved works for me!

   Is there any reason not to use Raspian?

   My first concern would be drivers for the Edirol SD-20s. I've never even SEEN them on my setup, it was completely plug 'n play, I just plugged them in and when I started to create a Generic Sound element in jOrgan, there they were!

    


      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 18:44, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
There is raspian. I'm thinking of doing a system based off of Gentoo Linux

Sent from my iPhone

On 11 Aug 2016, at 17:30, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:

    Mine's a Minty bit but I thought the Pi came with its own flavour of Linux???

    

      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 16:09, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
I have a pi3 which I shoulr probably test with for you guys and see how things go.

What woudl be the flavor of linux of choice?

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 10:26 AM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Julie,

                Very interesting post, thank you, I've often been tempted to dabble with Raspberry but it's pretty low on my priority list at present. I believe it has a USB spout, so you could use something like the external Soundblaser Live! 24 I use if I'm not happy with a computer's internal soundcard.

    Mind you, that's obsolete hardware now and, so far as I've seen, the modern replacements have a price tag that would look absurd in a Raspberry-based system!

    I don't need a soundcard for jOrgan as I use hardware synthesizers but I have used the Soundblaster on an auxiliary computer as a reverb. unit following the Edirol SD-20s that produce the analogue sound. 



      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 05:38, Julie Porter <[hidden email]> wrote:
I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

John Reimer
Administrator
In reply to this post by eagles051387
eagles051387 wrote
What do you guys think if i make a modified version of linux where jorgan
woudl load directly with the UI etc instead of a desktop environment.
Jonathan,

I would be very interested in this, as long as the installation procedure required of us is well documented.
However, before you spend time on such a trimmed version of Linux, we really should have reports on just how well Raspberry Pi3 handles jOrgan, especially as regards audio quality and latency. Another issue is its vulnerability to electromagnetic radiation.

John Reimer
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

Chester Berry
In reply to this post by Julie Porter
Julie,

I investigated the Raspberry Pi single-board computers earlier this year, but have not been able to find the time to actually get jOrgan (or anything else!) running on one.  There appears to be four ways to get sound out of a Pi:

[1] From the "3.5mm 4-pole audio/composite video out jack socket", which contains NTSC video plus two audio lines.  All indications I've seen are that the audio quality of this path is inadequate for applications like jOrgan.

[2] extracted from the HDMI output stream.  This requires an HDMI Audio Extractor, which commonly presents the two audio channels on a pair of standard RCA 1/8inch photo jacks.  Examples of this means are:
https://www.amazon.com/Tendak-Optical-Extractor-Converter-Splitter/dp/B00Y0920B4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1451868182&sr=8-1&keywords=HDMI+to+HDMI+%2B+Optical+TOSLINK+SPDIF+%2B+Analog+RCA+L+%2F+R+Stereo+Audio+Extractor+Converter+-+HDMI+Audio+Splitter+Adapter+%28HDMI+Input%2C+HDMI+%2B+Digital+%2F+Analog+Audio+Output%29

[3] via a USB sound card, such as described in the following artice:
http://plugable.com/2014/11/06/how-to-switch-to-usb-audio-on-raspberry-pi
or:
https://www.adafruit.com/products/1475

[4] using an add-on board, such as the HiFiBerry, which mounts on the 40-pin header, such as:
https://www.element14.com/community/community/raspberry-pi/raspberry-pi-accessories/cirrus_logic_audio_card
or:
https://www.hifiberry.com/

It is my understanding that to run jOrgan on a Raspberry Pi, it is necessary to install the Raspberry Pi version of Linux called Raspbian, plus the Java interpreter, plus jOrgan itself.  Some reconfiguration of Raspbian may be necessary to get sound out of the system.  Could you describe your installation procedure in detail, please?

Please continue to post on your experience with your Raspberry Pi!
/s/Chester H Berry
Salt Lake city, UTAH, USA



From: Julie Porter <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 10:38 PM
Subject: [jOrgan-user] Raspberry pi zero

I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

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planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Fw: Raspberry pi zero

Chester Berry



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Chester Berry <[hidden email]>
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 8:28 PM
Subject: Re: [jOrgan-user] Raspberry pi zero

Julie,

Resent to correct a potentially confusing typo, corrected in ALL CAPITALS below (PHONO, not "photo" as originally mis-typed!)
/s/Chester

I investigated the Raspberry Pi single-board computers earlier this year, but have not been able to find the time to actually get jOrgan (or anything else!) running on one.  There appears to be four ways to get sound out of a Pi:

[1] From the "3.5mm 4-pole audio/composite video out jack socket", which contains NTSC video plus two audio lines.  All indications I've seen are that the audio quality of this path is inadequate for applications like jOrgan.

[2] extracted from the HDMI output stream.  This requires an HDMI Audio Extractor, which commonly presents the two audio channels on a pair of standard RCA 1/8inch PHONO (as in phonograph) jacks.  Examples of this means are:
https://www.amazon.com/Tendak-Optical-Extractor-Converter-Splitter/dp/B00Y0920B4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1451868182&sr=8-1&keywords=HDMI+to+HDMI+%2B+Optical+TOSLINK+SPDIF+%2B+Analog+RCA+L+%2F+R+Stereo+Audio+Extractor+Converter+-+HDMI+Audio+Splitter+Adapter+%28HDMI+Input%2C+HDMI+%2B+Digital+%2F+Analog+Audio+Output%29

[3] via a USB sound card, such as described in the following artice:
http://plugable.com/2014/11/06/how-to-switch-to-usb-audio-on-raspberry-pi
or:
https://www.adafruit.com/products/1475

[4] using an add-on board, such as the HiFiBerry, which mounts on the 40-pin header, such as:
https://www.element14.com/community/community/raspberry-pi/raspberry-pi-accessories/cirrus_logic_audio_card
or:
https://www.hifiberry.com/

It is my understanding that to run jOrgan on a Raspberry Pi, it is necessary to install the Raspberry Pi version of Linux called Raspbian, plus the Java interpreter, plus jOrgan itself.  Some reconfiguration of Raspbian may be necessary to get sound out of the system.  Could you describe your installation procedure in detail, please?

Please continue to post on your experience with your Raspberry Pi!
/s/Chester H Berry
Salt Lake city, UTAH, USA



From: Julie Porter <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 10:38 PM
Subject: [jOrgan-user] Raspberry pi zero

I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user





------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

Julie Porter
In reply to this post by Julie Porter
Thanks for the info Chester;

Those links were helpful. The HDMI output, should be easy to convert to SPDIF.

It is easy to forget that the 5 dollar zero, is not a full computer.  Especially when connected to a large monitor and running it in GUI mode.  I actually have a number of small touchscreens.  Most are too small at about 2.8 inches to be of much use.  Larger touchscreens do exist.

I recently acquired a 2 manual style D Wurlitzer console.  A fairly well known one nicknamed Myrtle.  

With the low cost of these microcontrollers, it should be practical to have one processor per rank.  I did a project back in 2013 for Amica, where I used one of the 'Arduino' chips connected to a SD card to emulate an orchestrion.  The smallest card we could get in bulk was 4GB.  So the samples can be uncompressed WAV.

The old emutek relay used PLC controllers that were based on the 8051.  I upgraded these to the same chip in the 'Arduino.'  The output boards could be switched to produce pipe control signals or MIDI.  Extending the 'slave' interface board to present audio direct seems the logical next step.

-julie





Chester Berry  wrote:
Julie,

I investigated the Raspberry Pi single-board computers earlier this year, but have not been able to find the time to actually get jOrgan (or anything else!) running on one.? There appears to be four ways to get sound out of a Pi:

[1] From the "3.5mm 4-pole audio/composite video out jack socket", which contains NTSC video plus two audio lines.? All indications I've seen are that the audio quality of this path is inadequate for applications like jOrgan.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

eagles051387
In reply to this post by RoyR
Gentoo allows for what I would say better customizations and code optimizations as everything is compiled from source.

raspian when the first pi came out i wasnt too impressed with it, as it seemed rather clunky. I am curious to try it again on the pi3 i have.

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 7:57 PM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Jonathon,

                    Is that for any technical reason or just the one you happen to be most familiar with? That's really my situation with Mint, there are probably many other, equally good, ones but I just stick with what I've proved works for me!

   Is there any reason not to use Raspian?

   My first concern would be drivers for the Edirol SD-20s. I've never even SEEN them on my setup, it was completely plug 'n play, I just plugged them in and when I started to create a Generic Sound element in jOrgan, there they were!

    


      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 18:44, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
There is raspian. I'm thinking of doing a system based off of Gentoo Linux

Sent from my iPhone

On 11 Aug 2016, at 17:30, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:

    Mine's a Minty bit but I thought the Pi came with its own flavour of Linux???

    

      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 16:09, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
I have a pi3 which I shoulr probably test with for you guys and see how things go.

What woudl be the flavor of linux of choice?

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 10:26 AM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Julie,

                Very interesting post, thank you, I've often been tempted to dabble with Raspberry but it's pretty low on my priority list at present. I believe it has a USB spout, so you could use something like the external Soundblaser Live! 24 I use if I'm not happy with a computer's internal soundcard.

    Mind you, that's obsolete hardware now and, so far as I've seen, the modern replacements have a price tag that would look absurd in a Raspberry-based system!

    I don't need a soundcard for jOrgan as I use hardware synthesizers but I have used the Soundblaster on an auxiliary computer as a reverb. unit following the Edirol SD-20s that produce the analogue sound. 



      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 05:38, Julie Porter <[hidden email]> wrote:
I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

Pete Theisen
Do Gentoo updates still break everything?

On 08/12/2016 01:25 AM, Jonathan Aquilina wrote:

> Gentoo allows for what I would say better customizations and code
> optimizations as everything is compiled from source.
>
> raspian when the first pi came out i wasnt too impressed with it, as it
> seemed rather clunky. I am curious to try it again on the pi3 i have.
>
> Jonathan Aquilina
>
> On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 7:57 PM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]
> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>     Hi, Jonathon,
>
>                          Is that for any technical reason or just the
>     one you happen to be most familiar with? That's really my situation
>     with Mint, there are probably many other, equally good, ones but I
>     just stick with what I've proved works for me!
>
>         Is there any reason not to use Raspian?
>
>         My first concern would be drivers for the Edirol SD-20s. I've
>     never even SEEN them on my setup, it was completely plug 'n play, I
>     just plugged them in and when I started to create a Generic Sound
>     element in jOrgan, there they were!
>
>
>
>     Have fun,
>
>                  Roy.
>
>
>     On 11 August 2016 at 18:44, Jonathan Aquilina
>     <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>         There is raspian. I'm thinking of doing a system based off of
>         Gentoo Linux
>
>         Sent from my iPhone
>
>         On 11 Aug 2016, at 17:30, Roy Radford <[hidden email]
>         <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>>             Mine's a Minty bit but I thought the Pi came with its own
>>         flavour of Linux???
>>
>>
>>         Have fun,
>>
>>                     Roy.
>>
>>
>>         On 11 August 2016 at 16:09, Jonathan Aquilina
>>         <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>             I have a pi3 which I shoulr probably test with for you
>>             guys and see how things go.
>>
>>             What woudl be the flavor of linux of choice?
>>
>>             Jonathan Aquilina
>>
>>             On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 10:26 AM, Roy Radford
>>             <[hidden email]
>>             <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>                 Hi, Julie,
>>
>>                                 Very interesting post, thank you, I've
>>                 often been tempted to dabble with Raspberry but it's
>>                 pretty low on my priority list at present. I believe
>>                 it has a USB spout, so you could use something like
>>                 the external Soundblaser Live! 24 I use if I'm not
>>                 happy with a computer's internal soundcard.
>>
>>                     Mind you, that's obsolete hardware now and, so far
>>                 as I've seen, the modern replacements have a price tag
>>                 that would look absurd in a Raspberry-based system!
>>
>>                     I don't need a soundcard for jOrgan as I use
>>                 hardware synthesizers but I have used the Soundblaster
>>                 on an auxiliary computer as a reverb. unit following
>>                 the Edirol SD-20s that produce the analogue sound.
>>
>>
>>
>>                 Have fun,
>>
>>                             Roy.
>>
>>
>>                 On 11 August 2016 at 05:38, Julie Porter
>>                 <[hidden email]
>>                 <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>                     I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.
>>                     This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs
>>                     linux.
>>
>>                     I see there were some earlier postings to run
>>                     jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these
>>                     forums/email digest regarding the installation on
>>                     Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.
>>
>>                     I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi
>>                     zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So
>>                     I actually have dispositions on the pi now.
>>
>>                     I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the
>>                     jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI
>>                     software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent
>>                     would be needed.
>>
>>                     I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of
>>                     the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface
>>                     be needed and an outboard DAC?
>>
>>
>>                     -julie
>>
>>                     ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>                     What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors
>>                     network bandwidth and traffic
>>                     patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which
>>                     users, apps, and protocols are
>>                     consuming the most bandwidth. Provides
>>                     multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
>>                     J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed
>>                     decisions using capacity
>>                     planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>>                     _______________________________________________
>>                     jOrgan-user mailing list
>>                     [hidden email]
>>                     <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>                     https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>>                     <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>>
>>
>>
>>                 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>                 What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network
>>                 bandwidth and traffic
>>                 patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users,
>>                 apps, and protocols are
>>                 consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor
>>                 support for NetFlow,
>>                 J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions
>>                 using capacity
>>                 planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>>                 _______________________________________________
>>                 jOrgan-user mailing list
>>                 [hidden email]
>>                 <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>                 https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>>                 <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>>
>>
>>
>>             ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>             What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network
>>             bandwidth and traffic
>>             patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps,
>>             and protocols are
>>             consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor
>>             support for NetFlow,
>>             J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions
>>             using capacity
>>             planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>>             _______________________________________________
>>             jOrgan-user mailing list
>>             [hidden email]
>>             <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>             https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>>             <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>>
>>
>>         ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>         What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network
>>         bandwidth and traffic
>>         patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and
>>         protocols are
>>         consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support
>>         for NetFlow,
>>         J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using
>>         capacity
>>         planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>>         _______________________________________________
>>         jOrgan-user mailing list
>>         [hidden email]
>>         <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>         https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>>         <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>
>         ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth
>         and traffic
>         patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and
>         protocols are
>         consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for
>         NetFlow,
>         J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using
>         capacity
>         planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>         _______________________________________________
>         jOrgan-user mailing list
>         [hidden email]
>         <mailto:[hidden email]>
>         https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>         <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>
>
>
>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and
>     traffic
>     patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and
>     protocols are
>     consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
>     J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
>     planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>     _______________________________________________
>     jOrgan-user mailing list
>     [hidden email]
>     <mailto:[hidden email]>
>     https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>     <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
> patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
> consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
> J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
> planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> jOrgan-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>

--
Regards,

Pete
https://www.facebook.com/pete.theisen.5

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patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

eagles051387
Actually I had quite a rock solid development system I had to wipe it as i neede dot test something else on that machine.

On a more positive note. you dont need to compile from source if I wanted to I can release binaries for specific hardware and you just install those instead of compile from source.

Jonathan Aquilina

On Fri, Aug 12, 2016 at 7:36 AM, Pete Theisen <[hidden email]> wrote:
Do Gentoo updates still break everything?

On 08/12/2016 01:25 AM, Jonathan Aquilina wrote:
> Gentoo allows for what I would say better customizations and code
> optimizations as everything is compiled from source.
>
> raspian when the first pi came out i wasnt too impressed with it, as it
> seemed rather clunky. I am curious to try it again on the pi3 i have.
>
> Jonathan Aquilina
>
> On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 7:57 PM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]
> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>     Hi, Jonathon,
>
>                          Is that for any technical reason or just the
>     one you happen to be most familiar with? That's really my situation
>     with Mint, there are probably many other, equally good, ones but I
>     just stick with what I've proved works for me!
>
>         Is there any reason not to use Raspian?
>
>         My first concern would be drivers for the Edirol SD-20s. I've
>     never even SEEN them on my setup, it was completely plug 'n play, I
>     just plugged them in and when I started to create a Generic Sound
>     element in jOrgan, there they were!
>
>
>
>     Have fun,
>
>                  Roy.
>
>
>     On 11 August 2016 at 18:44, Jonathan Aquilina
>     <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>         There is raspian. I'm thinking of doing a system based off of
>         Gentoo Linux
>
>         Sent from my iPhone
>
>         On 11 Aug 2016, at 17:30, Roy Radford <[hidden email]
>         <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>>             Mine's a Minty bit but I thought the Pi came with its own
>>         flavour of Linux???
>>
>>
>>         Have fun,
>>
>>                     Roy.
>>
>>
>>         On 11 August 2016 at 16:09, Jonathan Aquilina
>>         <[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>             I have a pi3 which I shoulr probably test with for you
>>             guys and see how things go.
>>
>>             What woudl be the flavor of linux of choice?
>>
>>             Jonathan Aquilina
>>
>>             On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 10:26 AM, Roy Radford
>>             <[hidden email]
>>             <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>                 Hi, Julie,
>>
>>                                 Very interesting post, thank you, I've
>>                 often been tempted to dabble with Raspberry but it's
>>                 pretty low on my priority list at present. I believe
>>                 it has a USB spout, so you could use something like
>>                 the external Soundblaser Live! 24 I use if I'm not
>>                 happy with a computer's internal soundcard.
>>
>>                     Mind you, that's obsolete hardware now and, so far
>>                 as I've seen, the modern replacements have a price tag
>>                 that would look absurd in a Raspberry-based system!
>>
>>                     I don't need a soundcard for jOrgan as I use
>>                 hardware synthesizers but I have used the Soundblaster
>>                 on an auxiliary computer as a reverb. unit following
>>                 the Edirol SD-20s that produce the analogue sound.
>>
>>
>>
>>                 Have fun,
>>
>>                             Roy.
>>
>>
>>                 On 11 August 2016 at 05:38, Julie Porter
>>                 <[hidden email]
>>                 <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>>
>>                     I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.
>>                     This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs
>>                     linux.
>>
>>                     I see there were some earlier postings to run
>>                     jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these
>>                     forums/email digest regarding the installation on
>>                     Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.
>>
>>                     I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi
>>                     zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So
>>                     I actually have dispositions on the pi now.
>>
>>                     I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the
>>                     jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI
>>                     software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent
>>                     would be needed.
>>
>>                     I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of
>>                     the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface
>>                     be needed and an outboard DAC?
>>
>>
>>                     -julie
>>
>>                     ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>                     What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors
>>                     network bandwidth and traffic
>>                     patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which
>>                     users, apps, and protocols are
>>                     consuming the most bandwidth. Provides
>>                     multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
>>                     J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed
>>                     decisions using capacity
>>                     planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>>                     _______________________________________________
>>                     jOrgan-user mailing list
>>                     [hidden email]
>>                     <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>                     https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>>                     <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>>
>>
>>
>>                 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>                 What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network
>>                 bandwidth and traffic
>>                 patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users,
>>                 apps, and protocols are
>>                 consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor
>>                 support for NetFlow,
>>                 J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions
>>                 using capacity
>>                 planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>>                 _______________________________________________
>>                 jOrgan-user mailing list
>>                 [hidden email]
>>                 <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>                 https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>>                 <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>>
>>
>>
>>             ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>             What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network
>>             bandwidth and traffic
>>             patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps,
>>             and protocols are
>>             consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor
>>             support for NetFlow,
>>             J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions
>>             using capacity
>>             planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>>             _______________________________________________
>>             jOrgan-user mailing list
>>             [hidden email]
>>             <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>             https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>>             <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>>
>>
>>         ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>         What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network
>>         bandwidth and traffic
>>         patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and
>>         protocols are
>>         consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support
>>         for NetFlow,
>>         J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using
>>         capacity
>>         planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>>         _______________________________________________
>>         jOrgan-user mailing list
>>         [hidden email]
>>         <mailto:[hidden email]>
>>         https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>>         <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>
>         ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth
>         and traffic
>         patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and
>         protocols are
>         consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for
>         NetFlow,
>         J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using
>         capacity
>         planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>         _______________________________________________
>         jOrgan-user mailing list
>         [hidden email]
>         <mailto:[hidden email]>
>         https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>         <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>
>
>
>     ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>     What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and
>     traffic
>     patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and
>     protocols are
>     consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
>     J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
>     planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>     _______________________________________________
>     jOrgan-user mailing list
>     [hidden email]
>     <mailto:[hidden email]>
>     https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>     <https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
> patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
> consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
> J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
> planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> jOrgan-user mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
>

--
Regards,

Pete
https://www.facebook.com/pete.theisen.5

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Raspberry pi zero

RoyR
In reply to this post by eagles051387
   I'm probably a bit lazy these days and like that fact that Mint uses the Ubuntu repos. with some 45,000 programs pre-compiled ready to go.

   I'd feel a bit daunted at first by the prospect of compiling everything from source. I suppose, like most new stuff, it's no big deal once you've had a bit of practice. Presumably each program comes with a Make file?



      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 12 August 2016 at 06:25, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
Gentoo allows for what I would say better customizations and code optimizations as everything is compiled from source.

raspian when the first pi came out i wasnt too impressed with it, as it seemed rather clunky. I am curious to try it again on the pi3 i have.

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 7:57 PM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Jonathon,

                    Is that for any technical reason or just the one you happen to be most familiar with? That's really my situation with Mint, there are probably many other, equally good, ones but I just stick with what I've proved works for me!

   Is there any reason not to use Raspian?

   My first concern would be drivers for the Edirol SD-20s. I've never even SEEN them on my setup, it was completely plug 'n play, I just plugged them in and when I started to create a Generic Sound element in jOrgan, there they were!

    


      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 18:44, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
There is raspian. I'm thinking of doing a system based off of Gentoo Linux

Sent from my iPhone

On 11 Aug 2016, at 17:30, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:

    Mine's a Minty bit but I thought the Pi came with its own flavour of Linux???

    

      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 16:09, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
I have a pi3 which I shoulr probably test with for you guys and see how things go.

What woudl be the flavor of linux of choice?

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 10:26 AM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Julie,

                Very interesting post, thank you, I've often been tempted to dabble with Raspberry but it's pretty low on my priority list at present. I believe it has a USB spout, so you could use something like the external Soundblaser Live! 24 I use if I'm not happy with a computer's internal soundcard.

    Mind you, that's obsolete hardware now and, so far as I've seen, the modern replacements have a price tag that would look absurd in a Raspberry-based system!

    I don't need a soundcard for jOrgan as I use hardware synthesizers but I have used the Soundblaster on an auxiliary computer as a reverb. unit following the Edirol SD-20s that produce the analogue sound. 



      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 05:38, Julie Porter <[hidden email]> wrote:
I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Raspberry pi zero

eagles051387
That depends on the developer of that program. gentoo isnt like your normal linux distro and i would say discussion of how it works is a bit off topic for this list.

Jonathan Aquilina

On Fri, Aug 12, 2016 at 10:07 AM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:
   I'm probably a bit lazy these days and like that fact that Mint uses the Ubuntu repos. with some 45,000 programs pre-compiled ready to go.

   I'd feel a bit daunted at first by the prospect of compiling everything from source. I suppose, like most new stuff, it's no big deal once you've had a bit of practice. Presumably each program comes with a Make file?



      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 12 August 2016 at 06:25, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
Gentoo allows for what I would say better customizations and code optimizations as everything is compiled from source.

raspian when the first pi came out i wasnt too impressed with it, as it seemed rather clunky. I am curious to try it again on the pi3 i have.

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 7:57 PM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Jonathon,

                    Is that for any technical reason or just the one you happen to be most familiar with? That's really my situation with Mint, there are probably many other, equally good, ones but I just stick with what I've proved works for me!

   Is there any reason not to use Raspian?

   My first concern would be drivers for the Edirol SD-20s. I've never even SEEN them on my setup, it was completely plug 'n play, I just plugged them in and when I started to create a Generic Sound element in jOrgan, there they were!

    


      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 18:44, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
There is raspian. I'm thinking of doing a system based off of Gentoo Linux

Sent from my iPhone

On 11 Aug 2016, at 17:30, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:

    Mine's a Minty bit but I thought the Pi came with its own flavour of Linux???

    

      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 16:09, Jonathan Aquilina <[hidden email]> wrote:
I have a pi3 which I shoulr probably test with for you guys and see how things go.

What woudl be the flavor of linux of choice?

Jonathan Aquilina

On Thu, Aug 11, 2016 at 10:26 AM, Roy Radford <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi, Julie,

                Very interesting post, thank you, I've often been tempted to dabble with Raspberry but it's pretty low on my priority list at present. I believe it has a USB spout, so you could use something like the external Soundblaser Live! 24 I use if I'm not happy with a computer's internal soundcard.

    Mind you, that's obsolete hardware now and, so far as I've seen, the modern replacements have a price tag that would look absurd in a Raspberry-based system!

    I don't need a soundcard for jOrgan as I use hardware synthesizers but I have used the Soundblaster on an auxiliary computer as a reverb. unit following the Edirol SD-20s that produce the analogue sound. 



      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 11 August 2016 at 05:38, Julie Porter <[hidden email]> wrote:
I recently acquired some Rasberry pi zero boards.  This is the so called 5 dollar computer that runs linux.

I see there were some earlier postings to run jOrgan on the pi 3.  Some of the links on these forums/email digest regarding the installation on Raspberry pi  are broken or outdated.

I have been able to install Ghostscript on the pi zero and run my jOrgan configuration scripts.   So I actually have dispositions on the pi now.

I have not as yet attempted to install java,  the jOrgan relay and fludsynth.  I think a MIDI software link like Jack or the Linux equivalent would be needed. 

I am also not sure how sounds could be got out of the pi zero.  Would some sort of SPDIF interface be needed and an outboard DAC?


-julie

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/jorgan-user



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
jOrgan-user mailing list
[hidden email]
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

Chester Berry
In reply to this post by Julie Porter
Julie:

Thanks for letting me know that my previous post helped.
Regarding the broken links you encountered, the following might be helpful:

Back in January, "ray" ("rdudevoir") indicated:
I can now report that I am running Jorgan on a Raspberry PI 2 using jOrgan_3.21_Pi2_v0.3.tar.gz which can be found here:

Ray described his experience with Jorgan on a Raspberry Pi in his post dated 9:09am 1 January 2016.  The indicated file is no longer available. 

Back in January, I downloaded the indicated file, which is a tar ("Tape ARchive") file compressed wiht 7-Zip.  I was then distracted by the sorts of things my father would call "less important but more pressing", and did nothing further until recent posts on the Raspberry Pi appeared.  The indicated file:

01/03/2016  09:19 AM        36,871,525 jOrgan_3.21_Pi2_v0.3.tar.gz

contents can be extrated with the 7Zip utility, which can be downloaded for Windows from the OFFICIAL SITE for free at:

www.7-zip.org

I would suggest EXTREME CAUTION regarding downloading this from any other source.  I downloaded and installed the 64-bit version (as I'm running Windows 7 Professional) without difficulty.  The website indicates "Self-extracting capability for 7z format"; I did not attempt this. When 7-Zip was run on the gz file named above, it produced a new directory containing the uncompressed tar archive:

11/09/2015  08:07 AM        48,333,824 jOrgan_3.21_Pi2_v0.3.tar

The 7-Zip website indicates it can extract from tar archives; when run on this file, it created a directory containing:

08/12/2016  03:00 PM    <DIR>          jOrgan_3.21_Pi2_v0.3

which in turn contains:

11/08/2015  07:48 AM    <DIR>          jOrgan
11/09/2015  08:06 AM               509 jorgan.bsh

The bsh shell script contains:

#!/bin/bash
#*
#*    Run jOrgan 3.21 beta 1 for RASPBERRY Pi2
#*            jOrgan written bt Sven MEIER
#*            prepared by Bob RANDRIAMARO
#*
#* Dispositions must be modified with :
#*        - sound driver = jack
#*        - core = 4
#
#    set jack and alsa
 process_jack_id=$(pidof jackd)
 if  [[ -z $process_jack_id ]]
   then
    sudo modprobe snd_bcm2835
    /usr/bin/amixer numid=1 100
    /usr/bin/jackd -P70 -p1024 -dalsa -dhw:ALSA -r44100 -p1024 -n4 -P &
   fi
#
#    Run jOrgan server
 java -jar jOrgan/jorgan-3.21-beta1/jorgan.jar &
#

and the jOrgan directory contains two jOrgan dispositions and the jOrgan directory.

11/07/2015  11:25 AM    <DIR>          j3.21_christie_fs_3mp_320_02
11/05/2015  07:00 AM    <DIR>          j3.21_Stiehr-Mockers_2.0
11/07/2015  01:09 PM    <DIR>          jorgan-3.21-beta1

If I understand the workings of extracting from a .tar file correctly, the correct procedure would be to either run tar on the machine upon which you want the files to appear, and do so from the root directory, OR perform the extraction on a different machine and copy the files to the machine upon which you wish to actually run them.

Beyond an operating system, such as "Raspbian", stated to be based on Debian, jOrgan requires Java to run.  On 26 September 2013, the Raspberry Pi Foundation indicated:

All future Raspbian images will ship with Oracle Java by default

see: https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/oracle-java-on-raspberry-pi/
for details.

It would appear that all that is needed to have a working jOrgan installation on a Raspberry Pi is:

  • the Pi,
  • the necessary audio hardware (audio connections from Pi to amplifiers/speakers/headphones/etc,
  • a copy of Raspbian containing Java which can be downloaded for free from the Raspberry Pi site,
  • and Ray's archive file, which would be extracted to the correct location in the file system.

I have moved this file to my DropBox account, ready to be downloaded by anyone who wants it IF Ray has no objections.  Ray, please indicate.

Julie (and anyone else interested): I hope this also helps.

/s/Chester H Berry
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA


From: Julie Porter <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Sent: Thursday, August 11, 2016 11:07 PM
Subject: Re: [jOrgan-user] Raspberry pi zero

Thanks for the info Chester;

Those links were helpful. The HDMI output, should be easy to convert to SPDIF.

It is easy to forget that the 5 dollar zero, is not a full computer.  Especially when connected to a large monitor and running it in GUI mode.  I actually have a number of small touchscreens.  Most are too small at about 2.8 inches to be of much use.  Larger touchscreens do exist.

I recently acquired a 2 manual style D Wurlitzer console.  A fairly well known one nicknamed Myrtle.  

With the low cost of these microcontrollers, it should be practical to have one processor per rank.  I did a project back in 2013 for Amica, where I used one of the 'Arduino' chips connected to a SD card to emulate an orchestrion.  The smallest card we could get in bulk was 4GB.  So the samples can be uncompressed WAV.

The old emutek relay used PLC controllers that were based on the 8051.  I upgraded these to the same chip in the 'Arduino.'  The output boards could be switched to produce pipe control signals or MIDI.  Extending the 'slave' interface board to present audio direct seems the logical next step.

-julie





Chester Berry  wrote:
Julie,

I investigated the Raspberry Pi single-board computers earlier this year, but have not been able to find the time to actually get jOrgan (or anything else!) running on one.? There appears to be four ways to get sound out of a Pi:

[1] From the "3.5mm 4-pole audio/composite video out jack socket", which contains NTSC video plus two audio lines.? All indications I've seen are that the audio quality of this path is inadequate for applications like jOrgan.

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What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

Julie Porter
In reply to this post by Julie Porter
Hi Chester;

Yes that is the 'build' by 'ray' in the broken link I was looking for.

Tar is the native archive format on Linux. (and other unixes like BSD which undlerlies OSX)  There was a compressor called gzip  that made .gz files.   The two programs work together and form the backbone of most distribuitions.

I have a 7zip de compressor on my mac.  The pi should be able to extract .gz archives as this is the defacto standard.

I think jack is also fairly standard.  The nice thing about Raspbian is that it uses the debian apt-get command to install these sorts of extensions.

When you are ready, please PM me with the link to your dropbox.

-julie


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What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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Re: Raspberry pi zero

RoyR
Hi, Julie,

              Another interesting post from you! I've never used the Pi and have no idea what it comes with but, from your comments, it seems I could (apt) get anything else I needed. I wonder if it would recognise a couple of Edirol SD-20s!



   

      Have fun,

            Roy.


On 13 August 2016 at 23:28, Julie Porter <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Chester;

Yes that is the 'build' by 'ray' in the broken link I was looking for.

Tar is the native archive format on Linux. (and other unixes like BSD which undlerlies OSX)  There was a compressor called gzip  that made .gz files.   The two programs work together and form the backbone of most distribuitions.

I have a 7zip de compressor on my mac.  The pi should be able to extract .gz archives as this is the defacto standard.

I think jack is also fairly standard.  The nice thing about Raspbian is that it uses the debian apt-get command to install these sorts of extensions.

When you are ready, please PM me with the link to your dropbox.

-julie


------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
_______________________________________________
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What NetFlow Analyzer can do for you? Monitors network bandwidth and traffic
patterns at an interface-level. Reveals which users, apps, and protocols are
consuming the most bandwidth. Provides multi-vendor support for NetFlow,
J-Flow, sFlow and other flows. Make informed decisions using capacity
planning reports. http://sdm.link/zohodev2dev
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123