New Soundfont and New Tutorial

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New Soundfont and New Tutorial

John Reimer
Administrator

Early this year Dries brought to my attention some clever uses of the “SPEAR” Selection Tools. They had escaped my notice altogether. I was provoked to try out these new resources on some recordings I had already worked on - the Great Open Diapason No.2 on the Hill Organ in the Pitt Street Uniting Church, Sydney. This was the last organ exported to New South Wales by the Hill Company before they joined forces to form Hill, Norman and Beard. I have already made a preset based on that stop, but I was keen to see whether these new tools would improve matters, given that the recordings were marred by a very high noise level, which was produced, I think, by the high level of electromagnetic radiation in the Sydney CBD.

It is my intention to replace the existing Great Open Diapason 8 preset on the Earlwood Models 1c, 3a and 3b by this new preset, and would welcome other opinions before I do this. The new preset has the number 000:028, which means that it can be easily added to the EARLWOOD_313.sf2 soundfont using the Viena editor. Because this new stop has a smoother sound than the present one, I have in my own installation found it desirable to reduce level of the Principal 4 and the Fifteenth 2 slightly. This was done simply by going into Construct Mode and reducing the Velocity messages: Principal 4 from “80” to “70”, and Fifteenth 2 from “80” to “65”. It is also necessary to alter the appropriate Open Diapason 8 Rank message from “6” to “28”.

The samples in this preset are Short Hybrid Samples, but the sound has been made more interesting by including the Earlwood Wobble and noise at a low level. The download is about 3 MB.

The new preset can be downloaded with this link:
http://home.exetel.com.au/reimerorgans/SF/New_Open_Diapason_8.sf2

Also, I have written a new tutorial which incorporates the use of these Selection Tools. It refers to the use of SPEAR to clean both Short Hybrid Samples and longer recorded samples, and it covers the use of the various programs needed, such as Audacity, Endless Wav, AdsynDX, and others. It is intended that it replace my existing tutorial on the jOrgan Wiki Tutorials page (not the tutorial on Viena, but the other one).

As always, I would be grateful to be informed of any problems or errors.

Here is the link to this very long tutorial:
http://home.exetel.com.au/reimerorgans/ART/SAMPLE_CLEANING_USING_SPEAR.pdf

John Reimer
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Re: New Soundfont and New Tutorial

jonny
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WOW. I mean, wow!

So, I know (almost) nothing about SF2. I studied MIDI long ago, and now it's the future!

So there are banks of programs, and presets... Looking for a good intro, to "get" the concept(s) down.

Are you using Windows? Are you using "cool" VirtualMidiSynth?

Do you know, is the difference between this synthesiser (as oppose to the buillt-in, TERRIBLE MS GS Software Wavetable Synthesizer) just the SoundFonts?

I have a trial, and am thinking of checking out the Librarian... but don't (yet) appreciate

WHY  I should have different soundFonts (if I should, ie benefits), or
APPLICATIONS (what I can do!)


Looking forward to learning :D
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Re: New Soundfont and New Tutorial

jonny
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In reply to this post by John Reimer
WOW. I mean, wow!

So, I know (almost) nothing about SF2. I studied MIDI long ago, and now it's the future!

So there are banks of programs, and presets... Looking for a good intro, to "get" the concept(s) down.

Are you using Windows? Are you using "cool" VirtualMidiSynth?

Do you know, is the difference between this synthesiser (as oppose to the buillt-in, TERRIBLE MS GS Software Wavetable Synthesizer) just the SoundFonts?

I have a trial, and am thinking of checking out the Librarian... but don't (yet) appreciate

WHY  I should have different soundFonts (if I should, ie benefits), or
APPLICATIONS (what I can do!)


Looking forward to learning :D
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Re: New Soundfont and New Tutorial

jonny
This post has NOT been accepted by the mailing list yet.
In reply to this post by John Reimer
WOW. I mean, wow!

So, I know (almost) nothing about SF2. I studied MIDI long ago, and now it's the future!

So there are banks of programs, and presets... Looking for a good intro, to "get" the concept(s) down.

Are you using Windows? Are you using "cool" VirtualMidiSynth?

Do you know, is the difference between this synthesiser (as oppose to the buillt-in, TERRIBLE MS GS Software Wavetable Synthesizer) just the SoundFonts?

I have a trial, and am thinking of checking out the Librarian... but don't (yet) appreciate

WHY  I should have different soundFonts (if I should, ie benefits), or
APPLICATIONS (what I can do!)


Looking forward to learning :D
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Re: New Soundfont and New Tutorial

John Reimer
Administrator
In reply to this post by jonny
jonny wrote
WOW. I mean, wow!
Hi Jonny,

jOrgan is, strictly speaking, a program for flexible control of MIDI messages, with particular application to making “virtual organs” - i.e. musical instruments simulating the controls and sounds of pipe organs, and using MIDI keyboards along with computers  linked to appropriate audio systems. Somewhere in this process, “sound engines” are employed to generate the desired audio signals in response to MIDI signals fed into them as the keyboards are played. Most people these days use software synthesizers as the sound engines, where the computer does all the work instead of hardware devices built into an added-on soundcard. For the sake of convenience, jOrgan bundles the free-source Fluidsynth software synthesizer in with its program, and most us (but not all) are satisfied with the sounds it produces.

Along with the sound engine, we need a soundfont (.sf2 file) which is loaded into it. To get an excellent result, both the sound engine and the soundfont need to be of high quality. In addition to the soundfont, we need another file which is called the disposition. This sets up the various organ stops to be used, along with the graphical display. With jOrgan, the stops can be controlled by clicking on the stop icons on the display, or by using a touch screen, or by using the switches in the playing console, which have been arranged to send MIDI messages.

jOrgan enthusiasts make up the disposition files using the very impressive tools which jOrgan provides. We also make up the soundfonts, using a soundfont editor for that purpose. The two used most used by jOrgan developers are Viena (see the Synthfont website) or Polyphone (accessible at the Polyphone website).

A useful introduction to the soundfont techniques is my Tutorial on the use of Viena, found on the Tutorials page of the jOrgan Wiki pages.  Here is the link to that page:

http://sourceforge.net/apps/mediawiki/jorgan/index.php?title=Tutorials

You may also find my other tutorial interesting, as it refers to the other Windows programs which I and other developers have found useful. It refers specifically to the making of the sound samples, and especially to the use of recorded wave files in the process  (i.e. recordings made from actual pipe organs).

Finally, you may find something of use among the collection of articles I have on my website, accessible here:

http://home.exetel.com.au/reimerorgans/jOrgan_Index_Page.htm

The various methods available to us as jOrgan developers have provided simulated organ sounds of astonishing excellence.

John Reimer
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