Convolution

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Convolution

Aaron Laws
I was hoping to find something simple in Audacity, but was unable. I remember having this functionality very easily at hand in Cool Edit Pro 2.1, but that was back when I used Microsoft Windows.

How are you all applying impulse response convolution reverberation to recordings?

I can record my organ very simply by virtually plugging the output to the input and playing the organ. After making such a recording (without fluidsynth reverb), I would imagine running something like

convolve impulseresponse.wav recording.wav -o reverb-recording.wav;

Like I said, I haven't found anything like this. Any help is appreciated. Thank you.

In Christ,
Aaron Laws

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Re: Convolution

David Gritter
On linux machines  typically the sound generator output is directed through jackaudio to a reverberator (jconvolver), as well as to audio output for speakers.  Jconvolver output can be used directly for audio output, can be sent to speakers at the back of the room, or can be mixed into other audio channels with direct organ sounds.  In any case, you can configure audacity for jackaudio input and connect  whatever clean or convolution reverberator signals you want and simply record the result into audacity.

On 06/28/2017 02:53 PM, Aaron Laws wrote:
I was hoping to find something simple in Audacity, but was unable. I remember having this functionality very easily at hand in Cool Edit Pro 2.1, but that was back when I used Microsoft Windows.

How are you all applying impulse response convolution reverberation to recordings?

I can record my organ very simply by virtually plugging the output to the input and playing the organ. After making such a recording (without fluidsynth reverb), I would imagine running something like

convolve impulseresponse.wav recording.wav -o reverb-recording.wav;

Like I said, I haven't found anything like this. Any help is appreciated. Thank you.

In Christ,
Aaron Laws


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Re: Convolution

Aaron Laws
On Wed, Jun 28, 2017 at 7:40 PM, David Gritter <[hidden email]> wrote:
On linux machines  typically the sound generator output is directed through jackaudio to a reverberator (jconvolver), as well as to audio output for speakers.  Jconvolver output can be used directly for audio output, can be sent to speakers at the back of the room, or can be mixed into other audio channels with direct organ sounds.  In any case, you can configure audacity for jackaudio input and connect  whatever clean or convolution reverberator signals you want and simply record the result into audacity.

Thank you, that's very helpful. I use pulse audio and I'm not keen on setting up jack in addition, so what I did is record the dry sound with audacity, save, then "post-process" using fconvolver. fconvolver is the offline, file-based convolution engine corresponding to jconvolver. Since fconvolver runs offline, it takes much less time than the length of the recording to convolve the whole thing. I've found that a roughly seven minute recording takes less than .5 seconds or so to convolve with any of my impulse responses. This means that a different impulse response on the same recording can be computed in roughly no time.

Thanks again for the tip.

In Christ,
Aaron Laws

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